Overview: Uncovering the Ghostly Tales and Paranormal Activity at Merchant House Museum

The Merchant House Museum in Brooklyn, New York has a rich history dating back to the 19th century, but along with the historical artifacts and displays, the museum is also said to be home to some ghostly inhabitants. Join the Brooklyn Paranormal Society as we investigate the reported paranormal activity at the museum, including sightings of ghostly figures and strange occurrences in the Tredwell family's parlor. From the abolitionist movement to the underground railroad, discover the secrets and stories that may be fueling the ghostly activity at the Merchant House Museum.

Merchant House Museum

The Merchant House Museum, located in the heart of New York City’s Greenwich Village, offers visitors a unique glimpse into the lives of a wealthy merchant family in the 19th century. The building, which was home to the Tredwell family for nearly 100 years, has been meticulously preserved to give visitors an authentic experience of what life was like during this time period.

The museum, which is the only intact 19th century family home open to the public in New York City, features a wide range of original furnishings and decorative arts, including furniture, clothing, paintings, and household items. Visitors can explore the family’s parlor, dining room, and bedrooms, as well as the kitchen and servant’s quarters.

Chandelier at Merchant House Museum

One of the highlights of the museum is the Tredwells’ parlor, which is a beautiful example of the ornate Victorian style of the time. The room features a marble fireplace, a grand piano, and a variety of elegant furnishings. Visitors can also see a wide range of artwork, including paintings and sculpture, which were popular in the 19th century.

The museum also features a variety of interesting exhibits, including a display of clothing worn by the Tredwell family, as well as a collection of 19th century photographs and artifacts. Visitors can also learn about the Tredwells’ involvement in the abolitionist movement and the Underground Railroad, and learn about the spirits that inhabit the grounds.

The Merchant House Museum offers visitors a unique opportunity to step back in time and experience the lifestyle of a wealthy merchant family in 19th century New York City. Whether you’re a history buff or simply looking for a unique cultural experience, the museum is a must-see destination.

The parlor at Merchant House Museum

Merchant House Museum Visitor Information

The Merchant House Museum is open to the public for tours Wednesday through Sunday. Admission is $15 for adults, $12 for seniors, and $10 for students and children. Group tours are also available by appointment.

The plaque outside the landmark

The Tredwell Family

The Merchant House Museum is named after the Tredwell family, who lived in the home for nearly 100 years. The family, who were successful merchants in the 19th century, were known for their philanthropy and social activism.

Seabury Tredwell, the patriarch of the family, was a successful hardware merchant who built the home in 1832. His daughter Eliza, who inherited the house upon his death, was a prominent figure in the abolitionist movement and the Underground Railroad, which helped slaves escape to freedom in the North.

The Tredwells were also known for their involvement in the arts and culture of New York City. The family was part of the city’s elite social scene and hosted many notable figures of the time, including Charles Dickens and P.T. Barnum.

The Preservation of the Merchant House Museum

The Merchant House Museum is one of the most well-preserved 19th century homes in the United States. The museum has been able to maintain the home’s original architecture and decor through the dedicated efforts of its staff and volunteers.

In the early 20th century, the Tredwell descendants donated the house to the South Street Seaport Museum, which preserved the home as a museum. In 1936, the house was designated a National Historic Landmark, ensuring its preservation for future generations.

The Merchant House Museum continues to be a vital part of the Greenwich Village community, offering visitors a unique glimpse into the past and preserving the rich history of New York City.

The help's quarters in the attic.

Conclusion

The Merchant House Museum offers a unique and fascinating look into the lives of a wealthy merchant family in 19th century New York City. From the ornate Victorian decor to the displays of clothing and artifacts, the museum gives visitors an authentic and immersive experience. The Tredwell family’s involvement in the abolitionist movement and the Underground Railroad adds a deeper historical significance to the visit. The dedication of the staff and volunteers in preserving the home make it a must-see destination for history buffs and anyone interested in the culture and lifestyle of the 19th century.

Anthony LFounder

Anthony Long is the Chief Ectoplasm Officer of the Brooklyn Paranormal Society.

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